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Critic's Pic | Griffin Museum of Photography

Casabella
Photographs by Ilaria Ortensi
September 5, 2013

Ilaria Ortensi

Ilaria Ortensi - Untitled

Artist Statement
Massive constructions on the suburbs of big cities are a global phenomenon. The contemporary cities are changing their shape so much faster than in the past, that it is very hard for their inhabitants to integrate the new in their life and imaginary.

In my most recent work I focused my attention on the new, unbridled, and largely unnoticed development around Rome in Italy. Attracted by the concept and aesthetics of contemporary typologies of residential housing, I decided to turn some of these architectures into pieces of art, depicting them as something between sculptures and movie sets. In these way I tried to recreate a state where the buildings are still looking for an identity being something between pure "form and volume" and set for possible narrations.

Artist Bio
Ilaria Ortensi completed her B.A. in Cinema Studies at La Sapienza University of Rome in Italy. She then moved to Boston where in 2010 she completed the Post-Baccalaureate Program at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. She is currentely living in New York City and pursuing her MFA in photography at Columbia University.

Her work has been exhibited in group exhibitions such as Pass this on at the Stone Crop Gallery in Maine, Collective 9 at the Dog Eared Gallery in London and Out of Context at West Germany in Berlin. In 2010 her work was part of the PRC Student Exhibition at the Photographic Resource Center and of the Student Annual Exhibition at the Grossman Gallery and Anderson Auditorium of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. In the same year she had her solo show, Rooms, at the Stone Crop Gallery in Maine.

Stone Crop Gallery

In the early 1920s, Grace Merrill bought a small strip of land along a rocky ledge on Shore Road near Perkins Cove. Before a structure was built-even before she had a design for her new studio-she named the future home "Stonecrop" after the hardy flower that "clothes the rocks with starlike yellow bloom."

Miss Merrill built Stonecrop with salvaged materials from an old barn and other local structures. She reclaimed the barn's hand-hewn pine timbers to construct a 24-foot high great room, while a damaged 18th century dwelling supplied a stone fireplace and a unique staircase. As construction proceeded, she scoured the surrounding towns for wood, doors, windows-whatever she could find that fit her vision for the home. "From all sides, old materials seemed to pour in," Merrill wrote. "All summer, my long-suffering car was adorned with bags of cement, old brick, and iron in varied shapes."

The result of her vision is this unique house with a special history. Stonecrop has been a home to artists for much of the past century. Two previous owners, painter Ruth Seeger and printmaker Beverly Hallam, are still active in the Perkins Cove area. Current owner and photographer Dana Berenson welcomes you to Stonecrop and the Stonecrop Gallery. She's proud to inherit the creative legacy of Miss Merrill, and invites you to enjoy the artwork.



New iPhone show highlights trending technology

http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20130605-ENTERTAIN-306050310

By Anne Bryant
August 05, 2010 2:00 AM

Capturing life's unexpected moments has become infinitely easier with the use of technology, especially smart phones. With just a quick click, precious moments that might have otherwise been lost are saved.

But until recently, these snapshots were never considered "art." That was until galleries, including the StoneCrop Gallery in Cape Neddick, began celebrating these moments in time as part of its second annual gallery of cell phone photography hosted from May 24 to July 8.

"Photography is always evolving and changing. Why not with a cell phone?" said gallery owner Dana Berenson.

Berenson said there are more than 130 photographs hanging on the gallery walls, of which approximately 99 percent were taken on iPhones and the rest were taken on Android, Blackberry and similar smart phones.

While some phone photographers opted for an unmodified appearance, the use of phone applications including Instagram gave some of the photographs an antiqued or modified appearance that otherwise would not have been captured on a computer.

"The technology between a digital camera and a cell phone is enormous; a cell phone does things much faster and in ways a computer can't," Berenson said.

The exhibit's grand opening, scheduled for June 8, will likely draw a large crowd based on last year's turnout of over 150 people from all over the world. Many were eager to see how social media and technology changed the way artists viewed their work and the world around them.

"It was like Christmas every day," Berenson said of collecting photographs for the exhibit. "People were so surprised by the quality of photographs. They couldn't believe they were taken on a phone."

Subjects in the show are diverse, and cell-phone photography has also made this new art form affordable. Prices range from $50 to upward of a couple hundred dollars for the pieces.

"If someone's looking to collect photography, this is a great way to start," Berenson said. "There are some really beatuful photographs here."

Berenson said among the photographs include some limited editions from well-known artists that circulate through similar gallery exhibits.

However, Berenson said she encourages the community to come out to see the art exhibit to become inspired to capture their own magical moments. She said cell phone technology is a tool that can be used in everyday life.

"Instagram is fun. It can take the mundane and make it into something that's really cool. With different apps, people see it as a tool they can use to enhance their photography," Berenson said.

And with photographs of everything from scenery, nature, well-loved cartoon characters, portraits, and household objects, just to name a few, Berenson said there's a good chance everyone will find a photograph that appeals to them.

"There's something for everyone here," Berenson said. "The show is universal, we have artists represented from all over the world."

"Can you hear me now?"

StoneCrop Gallery's second annual cell-phone photography show, running now through July 8, will open with a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday. It is free and open to the public.


PRESS RELEASE:

StoneCrop Gallery presents its September photography exhibition: "Love, Hate, and Everything In Between," on view now through October 7th. All are welcome to the opening reception at the gallery on Saturday, September 15th from 4:00 to 6:00 pm. This exhibition includes photographs by:

Eric Almquist
Heather Barnes
Anthony Barron
Lindsey Beal
Dana Berenson
Matt Cronin
Ruth Dudley-Carr
Cori Lynne Forbes
Geoff Hargadon
Murray Hidary
Dallas James
Stefanie Klavens
Megan Ledbetter
Rahshia Linendoll-Sawyer
Chris Maliga
Lauren McMahon
Jen Nille
Tania Palermo
Stephen Sheffield
Allison Smith
Steph Telesco
Alexa Torre

StoneCrop Gallery is a seasonal fine art photography gallery located in scenic York, Maine, steps from the Ogunquit Museum of Art. Both a gallery and unique piece of architecture, StoneCrop has been a home to artists for much of the past century. Past exhibitions have included work by artists such as Henry Horenstein, Jim Dow, Yoav Horesh, Barbara Bosworth, Stephen Sheffield, Karin Rosenthal, Nancy Marshall and more. Please visit www.stonecropgallery.com for more information on the gallery, including its history and past exhibitions.





Art review: Exceptional show on exhibit at Stonecrop Gallery

http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20100805-ENTERTAIN-8050323

By Anne Bryant
August 05, 2010 2:00 AM

Pretty little Shore Road in Ogunquit, Maine, rolls and twists as it follows the coast, and nestled in one of those curves is StoneCrop Gallery. Photographer, gallery owner and curator Dana Berenson has taken this significantly historical building, important to the artists who have a tradition of moving to Ogunquit, and made it her home and home to an impressive den filled with fine art photography.

You'll notice the large format photography first, as Virginia Beahan's "Barrios Blanco" taken in Central Paraguay has a great synergy with Jim Dow's photographs of little taco trailers and Guillermo Srodek-Hart's "Gaitan Shrine." The colors and rawness of these photographs are stunning.

Barbara Bosworth's black and white pieces play with depth of field, bringing only those points of white in the foreground into focus. Simple subjects are romantic and dear in her hands. Ask about the pretty little book for sale that they've got stashed away - she collaborated with writers to produce a book of photography leafed with writing.

It was great speaking with helpful gallery sitter Megan Ledbetter, who revealed that another reason why these large format photographs are so special apart from their incredible execution is because slowly but surely, companies like Kodak are stopping production of their large format color films. While many of us think of photographers as harbingers of tradition, digital prints are widely regarded now as easier and more cost effective than their chemically processed counterparts.

You have to visit these photographs to understand the power of large format film. These buzz and hum with an energy that digital can only mimic. StoneCrop, a seasonal gallery, has always been a great place to see fine art photography defined, and this show is no exception.

Anne Bryant has been eating gelato for dinner. E-mail her your summer diet ideas at anne@wicked-neat.com.


StoneCrop Gallery features flowers in first group show

http://www.seacoastonline.com/articles/20100701-ENTERTAIN-7010323

An opening reception will take place from 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday, July 10, at StoneCrop Gallery, 805 Shore Road, York, Maine, featuring flower-themed photographs from Virginia Beahan, Eulogio Guzman, Jim Dow, Nancy Marshall, Dana Berenson, Guillermo Srodek-Hart, Valorie Fisher, Ted Tourlentes and more.

The gallery itself could be called a work of art, and the exhibit has strong ties to its namesake and history. In the early 1920s, Grace Merrill bought a small strip of land along a rocky ledge on Shore Road near Perkins Cove. Before a structure was built - even before she had a design for her new studio - she named the future home "Stonecrop" after the hardy flower that "clothes the rocks with starlike yellow bloom."

Merrill built Stonecrop with salvaged materials from an old barn and other local structures. She reclaimed the barn's hand-hewn pine timbers to construct a 24-foot high great room, while a damaged 18th century dwelling supplied a stone fireplace and a unique staircase. As construction proceeded, she scoured the surrounding towns for wood, doors, windows - whatever she could find that fit her vision for the home.

"From all sides, old materials seemed to pour in," Merrill wrote. "All summer, my long-suffering car was adorned with bags of cement, old brick, and iron in varied shapes."

The result of her vision is this unique house with a special history. Stonecrop has been a home to artists for much of the past century. Two previous owners, painter Ruth Seeger and printmaker Beverly Hallam, are still active in the Perkins Cove area. Current owner and photographer Dana Berenson welcomes you to Stonecrop and the Stonecrop Gallery. (207) 361-4215, www.stonecropgallery.com.




StoneCrop Gallery Presents Yoav Horesh

Yoav Horesh

Born in Jerusalem, Israel. Yoav Horesh has lived the United States since 1997.

Yoav has exhibited nationally and internationally including in Milano, Italy, BH25 in Kleve, Germany, Tel-Aviv's d&a gallery Nathan Bernstein Gallery and TNC Gallery in New York, Gallery Kayafas and The Photographic Resource Center in Boston, and also with Amnesty International among other venues. Yoav's work is part of the collection of The Addison Gallery for American Art, Museum of New Art in Michigan and other private collections. Horesh has received various awards, commissions and grants including the Agnes Martin Award, The Projektraum-Bahnhof25 residency award and the Mortimer Frank Grant.

For the past decade, Yoav has worked on water and landscapes series, as well as a number of photographic projects that deal with conflict, human tragedy and recovery in Israel, Laos, Cuba and the American Southwest. Currently he is working on a new project concerning historical sites of trauma in Europe and their transition into tourist attractions. Some of his recent work can be viewed on his website: www.yoavhoresh.com

Horesh holds a BFA in photography from the Massachusetts College of Art and an MFA from Columbia University in New York and currently on the teaching faculty at Massachusetts College of Art, Queens College, and Columbia University.




StoneCrop Gallery Presents Jim Dow




StoneCrop Gallery will be opening May 23rd and will be featuring the work of Eric Almquist

Eric Almquist

Eric Almquist has had a life-long interest in photography and the history of photography. He is both a practicing photographer and a collector, and has exhibited at Stanford University and several venues in Massachusetts. His work includes landscape and social landscape photography, done mainly in Nebraska, New England, and the UK. He has recently completed a project called "Trinity", which focuses on the first three atomic bomb sites-Trinity (New Mexico), Hiroshima, and Nagasaki. In January 2009, his Trinity pictures were exhibited at the Belmont Gallery of Art in Belmont, Massachusetts.

The current exhibit at StoneCrop Gallery is entitled Consumer Vernacular and focuses on images from everyday life.

Eric received a B.A. from Stanford University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from Boston University. He is currently a Partner at Bain & Company. He serves on the Board of Trustees of the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University.




Caleb was published in Apeture Foundation last year as an Honorable Mention. Here is what they had to say about him!

Using the laws of physics as a springboard, Caleb Charland puts elements such as fire, water, and man-made compounds to the artistic test in his series Demonstrations. In these alchemic images, he captures scientific phenomena in moments of still life as well as full-tilt action, calling to mind such forebears as Harold Edgerton and his freeze-frame milk droplets.

What happens when a can of WD-40 is sprayed directly into a flame? Don't try this at home, instead, take in Charland's gelatin-silver rendering of a ghostly chemical cloud enshrouding a lit candle. The disembodied hand in the far right corner is a nod to the wizard behind the curtain. In another pyrotechnic feat, a drill outfitted with a sparkler creates a perfectly symmetric spiral of light.

The yin and yang of strength and frailty are summoned by a weighty horseshoe magnet held in place with string and a cluster of delicate nails. Though the nails and the magnet are attracted to one another, in one of those sleight-of-hand tricks of nature, they never touch. In another poetic image, a trio of glasses act as vessels for water in its three forms: as a liquid, a solid, and a gas.

Among his influences, Charland cites children's books of science experiments and the kinetic art of Peter Fischli and David Weiss. - SC




StoneCrop gallery is featured in the July/August Issue of New England Home and Architecture Magazine:

Design Destination Ogunquit Maine by Cheryl and Jeffery Katz

What better way to wile away an afternoon than to drive along the Maine Coast to Ogunquit? The quintessential New England Village boasts three-and-a-half miles of beach and and one-and-a-quarter-mile footpath along the rocky coast that joins the town center to the harbor.

At StoneCrop Gallery the photography gallery's charming owner, Dana Berenson might show you the work of Israeli Artist Yoav Horesh or, if your really lucky give you a tour of her house.The house built in the early 1920's by artist Grace Merrill, boasts a great room constructed from salvaged materials including hand-hewn pine timbers from an old barn and an eighteenth century-stone fire place.

805 Shore Road., (207)-361-4215 www.stonecropgallery.com




Jason Landry of the Online Magazine Big Red and Shiny wrote a rave review of Yoav Horesh's Seascape Exhibit. Please Check it out.

Yoav Hores @ StoneCrop Gallery







Stonecrop Gallery exhibition features Henry Horenstein

http://www.yorkindependent.net/news/2007/2007_07_25/070725_ON_stone.cfm

OGUNQUIT - Stonecrop Gallery's midsummer exhibition, "Humans and Other Creatures," features the photographs of New England icon Henry Horenstein.

For nearly four decades, Horenstein has been an author, artist, photographer and professor. He has published more than 40 books, and his work has been featured in the Smithsonian Museum, the Harvard Museum of Natural History and galleries throughout the United States and Europe.

"Horenstein is a New England treasure," said gallery owner Dana Berenson. "He has a remarkable ability to adapt his vision and style to his subject matter, from documentary projects to more abstract and conceptual series. There is truly no one else like him."

The Stonecrop exhibition features selections from several different bodies of work, including "Humans," a study of the human form, and "Creatures," with images of animals in zoos and aquariums.

The Horenstein exhibition will run through Aug. 16 at Stonecrop Gallery in the historic Stonecrop House on Shore Road, next to the York-Ogunquit town line, just outside of Perkins Cove and 100 yards from the Ogunquit Museum of American Art.

The gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday through Monday, or by appointment.

Directions and gallery information are available at http://www.stonecropgallery.com/.




Stonecrop Gallery a home for fine photography

http://www.seacoastonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070829/LIFE/708290317/-1/TOWN0110

By Amy Phalon
yorkweekly@seacoastonline.com
August 29, 2007 6:00 AM
YORK — Continuing a nearly 100-year-old creative legacy, Dana Berenson has reopened the Stonecrop Gallery on Shore Road near the York-Ogunquit town line.


A woman looks works of fine art photography
during a recent artists' opening at StoneCrop Gallery.

StoneCrop gallery owner and photographer Dana
Berenson sits surrounded by fine art photography
within the Shore Road gallery.

 

The gallery is located in Stonecrop house, which according to Berenson has sheltered artists and art galleries since it was built by painter Grace Merrill in the early 1920s. Merrill named the house Stonecrop after the tiny yellow blooms that grow along the rocky ledge into which the house is built.

The new gallery currently features the abstract black and white photography of Caleb Charland of Brewer. His photography offers a strikingly different perspective on ordinary household objects. "He is a young photographer, a recent graduate from Massachusetts College of Art, who is taking the photo world by storm," Berenson said.

One of the mesmerizing Charland photographs offered for sale at Stonecrop is titled "15 — hours." The photo records a candle burning over a 15-hour period. "He said that the Edgar Allen Poe Society bought 15-hours," Berenson said. "He was really happy about that."

Past shows included the work of Henry Horenstein, who lives in Boston. Horenstein has published dozens of books of photography including "Honkey Tonk Humans," devoted to the world of country music. Some of Horenstein's work is still available at Stonecrop as well as a few photographs by Thomas Gearty, also of Boston, who does some of his work with a digital camera.

Berenson plans to offer the work of these three artists, as well as her own photography at Stonecrop until the end of October, when she will close for the winter as her neighbor The Ogunquit Museum of Art ends its season.

"I'm really looking forward to featuring the work of photographers from Maine and New England again next season," she said.

Berenson has been the steward of Stonecrop house for the past two years. She said that before her, it was occupied by artists including painter Ruth Seeger and printmaker Beverly Hallam.

The home is a completely unique post-and-beam, shingled structure constructed from the wood of an old barn salvaged by Merrill. She also collected materials from old houses and buildings slated for demolition. "It's basically a recycled house," Berenson said.

The Stonecrop Gallery offers a preview of available artwork on its Web site, www.stonecrop gallery.com.




The Independent Wednesday May 23rd, 2007

http://www.yorkindependent.net/news/2007/2007_05_23/070523_AR_stonecrop.cfm

CAPE NEDDICK - For the better part of the past century, the picturesque Stonecrop House on Shore Road was the home of local artists.

This week the historic home's current owner, artist Dana Berenson, will revive Stonecrop House's artistic tradition when she opens Stonecrop Gallery for its first full season this Friday, May 25.

The gallery is located on the York-Ogunquit town line, in the unique Stonecrop House at 805 Shore Road. The gallery is situated just outside Ogunquit's Perkins Cove and only 100 yards from the Ogunquit Museum of American Art.

"Stonecrop Gallery opened for a trial run last summer, and got a great response from tourists and the community," Berenson said in an announcement of Friday's event. "We're thrilled to open up for the full season for 2007 and proud to continue the tradition of showing fine art at Stonecrop."

She noted that Stonecrop Gallery will be one of the few galleries in the area to feature only fine photography.

Previous owners of Stonecrop House include artists Beverly Hallam and Ruth Seeger, Berenson noted.

At the gallery, Berenson will show her own work, which includes both black-and-white and color images, with subjects that range from travel photography to documentary photography of the Maine coast.

This month's opening exhibition will also feature a new body of work by New England photographer and gallery artist Thomas Gearty, color prints from a new series made on Martha's Vineyard.

Following Friday's official opening, Stonecrop Gallery will be open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday through Monday, or by appointment, from Memorial Day weekend to the first weekend in October.

Directions and gallery information are available at www.StonecropGallery.com.

Watch upcoming editions of The Independent for a special feature on this historic property and new gallery.


York County Star Thursday May 24, 2007

StoneCrop Gallery 805 Shore Road, Cape Neddick 207-361-4215
stonecrop@stonecropgallery.com
Open 11-6pm., Thursday though Monday or my appointment. The gallery will remain open from Memorial Day Weekend to the first weekend in October.

For most of the last century, historic and picturesque StoneCrop House was the home of Cape Neddick artist. This spring, current owner and artist Dana Berenson will revive that artist tradition when she opens StoneCrop Gallery for its first full season on Friday May 25th.

The Gallery is located in the unique home on Shore Road, next to the town line between York and Ogunquit just outside of Perkins Cove and 100 yard from the Ogunquit Museum of American Art. StoneCrop Gallery will be one of the few art resources in the area to exclusively feature fine art photography.

“StoneCrop Gallery opened for a trial run last summer, and got a great response from tourists and the community” Says Berenson. “We’re thrilled to open for the full season for 2007 and proud to continue the tradition of showing fine art at StoneCrop.

Previous owners include such artists as Beverly Hallum and Ruth Seeger.  Berenson will show her own work, which includes black-and-while and color images. Her subjects range from travel photography to documentary photography of the Maine costal region.

This months opening exhibition will also feature a new body of work by New England Photographer and gallery artist Thomas Gearty. Gearty’s photographs are color prints from a new series made on Martha’s Vineyard.

Thomas Gearty was one of 80 artists worldwide selected for the 2001 Sotheby’s Artline international emerging artists program, with exhibitions and actions in Chicago, Vienna, and Tel Aviv, His photographs have been exhibited across the United States including the Bonni Benrubi Gallery in New York City and the G. Ray Hawkins Gallery in California.


Gallery REVIVES A LOCAL ARTISTIC TRADITION IN YORK’S HISTORIC STONECROP HOUSE

New Stonecrop Gallery on York/Ogunquit Line Specializes in Fine Art Photography

YORK, MAINE—May 8, 2007—For most of the last century, historic and picturesque Stonecrop House was the home of Cape Neddick artists. This spring, current owner and artist Dana Berenson will revive that artistic tradition when she opens Stonecrop Gallery for its first full season on Friday, May 25.

The gallery is located in the unique, majestic home on Shore Road, next to the town line between York and Ogunquit just outside of Perkins Cove and 100 yards from the Ogunquit Museum of American Art. Stonecrop Gallery will be one of the few art resources in the area to exclusively feature fine photography.

“Stonecrop Gallery opened for a trial run last summer, and got a great response from tourists and the community,” says Berenson. “We’re thrilled to open up for the full season for 2007 and proud to continue the tradition of showing fine art at Stonecrop.”

Previous owners include such artists as  Beverly Hallam  and  Ruth Seeger.  Berenson will show her own work, which includes both black-and-white and color images. Her subjects range from travel photography to documentary photography of the Maine coastal region.

This month’s opening exhibition will also feature a new body of work by New England photographer and gallery artist Thomas Gearty. Gearty’s photographs are color prints from a new series made on Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.

Stonecrop Gallery is open from 11 to 6 p.m., Thursday through Monday, or by appointment. The gallery will remain open from Memorial Day weekend to the first weekend in October. Directions and gallery information at www.StonecropGallery.com.

© 2007-2014 StoneCrop. All Rights Reserved.